Turkey’s Pro-Western Imperialism Puppets Accuse Turkish People of Being “Conspiracy Theorists”

Western Influenced & Directed Regime Change Operations are Deemed as a “Conspiracy Theory”

I just finished reading a ridiculous hit piece published at Eurasia.Net accusing the Turkish people of being conspiracy theorists for believing that the imperial US and EU are engaged in schemes towards regime change around the world. According to the article and its sources, one must be ignorant, uninformed, uneducated and a big time conspiracy theorist in order to believe that the US-EU are engaged in political manipulations and regime change operations around the world.

Here is one of the article sources attributing the Turkish people’s distrust of the West to their ignorance, paranoia and conspiracy mindedness:

“Turks love it,” argued Cengiz Aktar, a senior scholar at Sabanci University’s Istanbul Policy Forum, “because they don’t know the world. Turks are very much monolingual. They don’t read newspapers much. They don’t know what the world thinks about them. So, when you don’t know about it, you fear or you invent theories. The majority of Turks love these kind of stories.”

You see, there is no mention of history such as the US-delivered military coup in Turkey or of the US-backed and directed Mullah named Fethullah Gulen. According to the authors of the article and their agenda-driven sources, the latest US-EU produced regime change operations around the world, such as in Libya, Egypt, Syria, Ukraine, and now in Venezuela, never happened! Seriously!

Contrary to what they claim, Turkish people are extremely involved in political developments. The ignoramus source claims that most Turkish people don’t read newspapers. I tell you what: if they were to survey and compare the number of critical newspaper readers in Turkey with those here in the United States, the ratio would be something like: Turkey: 75%, USA: 20%.

The propaganda source also accuses Turks of being monolingual, thus, ignorant. Are you kidding me? Again, if you were to compare the percentage of Turks fluent in two or more languages with those here in the United States, you’d be asking this guy what he’s high on!

All right, it gets even more bizarre. The authors and their sources engage in this self-fulfilling prophesy to make a point that the Turkish people’s conspiracy theories on Western manipulation of their politics has resulted in a decrease of investment and financial contributions by the West in the country:

Turkey also could be paying an economic cost for the conspiracy theories. “The problem is that the foreign investors are just laughing at this and Turkey is going through a very serious test of creditability,” analyst Aktar said.

Turkey’s net foreign-direct investment (FDI) of $9.6 billion is just over half its level in 2009, The Financial Times reported on February 13.

Okay, let me explain the perverse logic (or actually, lack of logic) here. What is one of the first guns brought out by Western Imperialists when they are faced with a foreign government that is refusing to bow and submit? Right: money guns. Whether it is bribery via IMF, World Bank or military aid, or, strategically (with agenda) made investments, money is one of the first vehicles used to destabilize a government or a regime when the purpose is regime change. So what happens when the Turkish PM flexes his muscles and starts showing an independent streak? Of course: you get US and its European allies showing their displeasure and pressurizing via withdrawing their money: foreign investments in the country, IMF loans, military and humanitarian aid, etc.

Now, Turkish people who read and pay attention to the news and developments around them, Turkish people who observe and witness how governments are being brought down right next to them in their own backyard, Turkish people who have a long experience of Western operations on their soil are called conspiracy theorists and ignorant for believing that the current state of affairs in their nation is largely due to Western-Scripted plots. And to prove the point, the author and his idiotic sources are pointing to Western players withdrawing their money from Turkey and pressuring the country financially!

I totally understand our media here in the United States concocting propaganda filled and false news and analyses. In fact, if you pay attention to the line of reasoning (or lack of), labeling, marginalization and insults in this article, you see solid parallels with those written on 9/11 and civil liberties activists, real government whistleblowers or those who have dared to run as independent candidates without the establishment’s backing. What I don’t understand is the sources in Turkey who have willingly played into the hands of the operatives and joined the imperialist choir in portraying and accusing the Turkish people and their vigilance as being ignorant and being conspiracy theorists. For those of you in Turkey: please find these sources and demand some explanation and accountability.

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Sibel Edmonds is the Publisher & Editor of Boiling Frogs Post and the author of the Memoir Classified Woman: The Sibel Edmonds Story. She is the recipient of the 2006 PEN Newman's Own First Amendment Award for her “commitment to preserving the free flow of information in the United States in a time of growing international isolation and increasing government secrecy” Ms. Edmonds has a MA in Public Policy and International Commerce from George Mason University, a BA in Criminal Justice and Psychology from George Washington University.

Making Afghanistan Safe for Heroin

US Media & The Perpetual Flip-Flopping on Drug-Related Stories

When I read Mizgin’s recent great post about Richard Armitage and his involvement in the Golden Triangle, I rolled my eyes.  “Some Daily Kos reader out there,” I thought, “is, at this very moment, shouting ‘conspiracy theory’ at their computer.” The “conspiracy theory” accusation comes up any time a journalist or a whistleblower points out that U.S. officials and agencies have been complicit in the global drug trade.  In fact, it has been an effective tool to try and silence truth tellers at least since Alfred McCoy was viciously attacked for writing the Politics of Heroin in Southeast Asia.  Never mind the fact that allegations against the Central Intelligence Agency or the State Department have often been vindicated with the passage of time.  It just can’t be true that America would support drug lords, can it?

Unfortunately, the answer to that question is a resounding YES, IT CAN.  American agencies, including the C.I.A. and the State Department, have given aid and comfort to international drug lords in the past and apparently continue to do so.  Just read what the New York Times reported on October 28th about Ahmed Wali Karzai, the brother of Afghan President Hamid Karzai and a known drug dealer, being on the C.I.A. payroll:

The C.I.A.’s practices also suggest that the United States is not doing everything in its power [Emphasis Added] to stamp out the lucrative Afghan drug trade, a major source of revenue for the Taliban.

Gee, do ya think? Any enterprising individual of reasonable intelligence, using a minimum of Google research skills, could have determined that the drug trade out of Afghanistan has skyrocketed since late 2001, shortly after the U.S. removed the Taliban from power and installed Hamid Karzai as its puppet.   If the Times had been a little bit bolder, they might have written something like this:

The C.I.A is complicit in the illegal drug trade in Afghanistan, but this should surprise no one, as a peek at the historical record demonstrates drug complicity has become routine.  Just look at these facts:

1950s, Southeast Asia: The C.I.A. supports the Kuomanting (KMT) drug running in Burma.

1960s-1970s, Vietnam-Laos: Richard Armitage, Ted Shackley and Thomas Clines finance a portion of the Phoenix Program in Vietnam through the Southeast Asian heroin trade.

1980s, Southwest Asia: The C.I.A. supports Afghan rebels, many of whom, along with the Pakistani ISI, are known to be deeply involved in opium and heroin trade.

1980s, Latin America: The U.S. backs Contras, even though cocaine turns out to be a key source of their funding, and Panama dictator Manuel Noriega, also tied to the drug trade. Also in this time period, Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) Agent Michael Levine claims Attorney General Edwin Meese blew the cover of a DEA team investigating drug corruption at the highest levels of the U.S. government.

1990s, Burma: DEA Agent Richard Horn, whose case was recently settled with the Justice Department, is spied on by the State Department and C.I.A., apparently because Horn was being too aggressive in trying to shut down the opium trade from Burma.

1996-2002: Sibel Edmonds testifies that criminal elements in Turkey tied to the drug trade, with knowledge and acquiescence of the State Department, bring drugs into the U.S. and Europe.

None of these past Agency misdeeds were mentioned by the Times to give its story context. The reason for these omissions is obvious: the Times or someone in the American government had an axe to grind either with the C.I.A. or the Karzai government itself, and the story was only trotted out because it was convenient for the moment.  A few months from now, if some really enterprising journalists accuse the U.S. government of aiding the Afghan opium trade, the major newspapers will likely ignore them, or, worse, accuse them of being conspiracy mongers.  This is exactly how our trusted mainstream press has treated C.I.A. drug stories in the past:  When it is convenient to promote one of their pet agendas, the establishment media admit the shocking facts.  Then, when it is no longer serving its purposes, the same press turns around and marginalizes anyone repeating the same.  Take the example of Oliver North, Gary Webb, and the Washington Post.

According to a 1998 book Whiteout by Alexander Cockburn and Jeffrey St. Clair, in order to torpedo Oliver North’s 1994 Virginia Senate candidacy, the Post published a hard-hitting article on October 22, 1994, entitled “North Didn’t Relay Drug Tips”.  The gist of the story (written by Lorraine Adams) was that while he was running the illegal Contra War from his post on the National Security Council, North failed to forward to the Drug Enforcement Agency the evidence that several members of the FDN (the main Contra organization) were involved in the cocaine business. North had claimed to have “turned over to the DEA all evidence of Contra drug running” during his Congressional testimony.  The Post found the story useful at the time, given the newspaper’s opposition to North’s candidacy.  However, two years later, when journalist Gary Webb and the San Jose Mercury News tied the Contras to a large crack cocaine ring in Los Angeles, the Post apparently forgot its own reporting, and (along with the New York Times and Los Angeles Times) ripped Webb’s career apart.  Cockburn and St. Clair wrote:

Friday, October 4 [1996] the Washington Post went to town on Webb and on the Mercury News. The onslaught carried no less than 5,000 words in five articles. The front page featured a lead article by Roberto Suro and Walter Pincus, headlined, “CIA and Crack: Evidence Is Lacking of Contra-Tied Plot.”

The rest is history.  Webb was destroyed, which ultimately led to his suicide years later.  In the meantime, the U.S. Congress did nothing, which is something it is accustomed to doing in cases involving accusations of Executive Branch malfeasance.  Two years after Webb’s Dark Alliance series, the C.I.A. Inspector General actually released a report admitting aspects Contra drug running, but this report was barely covered by the same newspapers that had eviscerated the story in the first place.

The press gets away with their perpetual flip-flopping on drug-related issues for a simple reason: The “C.I.A. drug trade complicity” tale is not the kind of story the average citizen wants to believe.  This topic is a taboo because the public has been trained to have a visceral reaction to drugs.  Ever since propaganda films like Reefer Madness were released at the beginning of the 20th Century, drug dealers have been made out to be public enemy number one and are hated perhaps even more than terrorists.  Recreational drugs are often portrayed as a weapon of mass destruction on America’s youth.  It just can’t be possible that our trusted officials -- like Orrin Hatch, to cite one example, -- would rail against drugs, claiming they endanger our children on the one hand, while moving in Congress to quash any attempt to hold federal agencies accountable for working with the pimps and pushers on the other. 

Wake up, America.  Our government’s acquiescence in the global drug trade is not just possible; it is an important part of our nation’s post-World War II history.  Obama’s surge in Afghanistan is doomed to failure, in part because our intelligence agencies are fostering the same poppy trade that helps finance our enemies, the Taliban.  We know it is doomed because all of the other C.I.A. drug operations have ended in similar catastrophes.  Of course, the one “success” the U.S. government could point to, if it were willing to admit the facts of its drug alliances, is the defeat of the Soviet Army in Afghanistan.  However, given what happened over a decade later on September 11, 2001, that “success” looks like an awful “short-sightedness” and “long-term failure”.  

It is sad to think how many of our young men and women are dying, or are permanently scarred, mentally or physically, in the false belief that they are engaged in some higher moral battle to bring democracy and an end to the heroin trade in Afghanistan.  Until the public realizes the truth about the dark history of U.S. intelligence agencies and drugs, such illusions about the morality of America’s endless wars will continue.

 

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