Operation Moldova: A New NATO Anti-Russia War Project

In the forty-seventh edition of the Russian Newspapers Monitor, Professor Filip Kovacevic discusses the articles from four Russian newspapers: Rossiyskaya Gazeta, Kommersant, Izvestia, and Nezavisimaya Gazeta. He discusses the escalating political and constitutional crisis in Moldova, the site of another proxy war-in-the-making between NATO and Russia in Eastern Europe, and the statements on North Korea made by the Russian president Vladimir Putin, the Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe, and the South Korean president Moon Jae-in during the Far Eastern Economic Forum. In addition, he chronicles the significant increase of Russia’s food exports and explains why China has been more successful than Russia in bringing into the country thousands of Ukrainian military industry engineers and specialists and their families.

NOTE: The Russian newspaper Kommersant wrongly reported the president of Mongolia as Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj. The current president of Mongolia is Khaltmaagiin Battulga.
 

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Show Notes

Rossiyskaya Gazeta – September 11, 2017

Kommersant – September 8, 2017

Izvestia – September 11, 2017

Nezavisimaya Gazeta – September 8, 2017

NATO Incites Ukraine to War against Russia

In the forty-fifth edition of the Russian Newspapers Monitor, Professor Filip Kovacevic discusses the articles from four Russian newspapers: Izvestia, Rossiyskaya Gazeta, Nezavisimaya Gazeta, and Pravda. He discusses the exclusive frontpage interview by the former Afghan president Hamid Kharzai, sharply critical of the U.S. president Donald Trump, in the pro-government Izvestia. In addition, he chronicles the U.S. Secretary of Defense James ‘Mad Dog’ Mattis’ visit to Ukraine and how the U.S. and NATO are planning out total political and economic isolation of Russia. Lastly, he discusses some recent Gladio C provocative operations in the Russian border regions. The NATO-Russia proxy conflicts are getting more and more dangerous to world peace. Do not miss this exclusive edition of the Russian Newspapers Monitor!

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Show Notes

Izvestia – August 25, 2017

Rossiyskaya Gazeta – August 25, 2017

Nezavisimaya Gazeta – August 29, 2017

Pravda – August 25, 2017

Newsbud Roundtable- “A Turning Point in the Middle East & the Fall of an Empire!”

Newsbud Founder-Editor Sibel Edmonds joins foremost Middle East expert and analyst Prof. William Engdahl and top Russia-Balkans expert Professor Filip Kovacevic in a one-of-a-kind roundtable discussion on a Turning Point in the Middle East and the fall of the US Empire. Our distinguished panelists discuss Turkey’s major shift away from NATO and into further alliance with Russia, Iran and the rest of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, the contentious coming Kurdish referendum, the recent Turkey-Germany spat, the CIA’s Fethullah Gulen’s infiltration of the German government, and much more.

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Show Notes

Turkey’s Shift from NATO Is Redrawing the Map

Turkey Urges Iraqi Kurds to Abandon Independence Vote

U.S. Urges Kurdistan to Delay Independence Referendum

Germany’s Juncker Says Erdogan’s Turkey Taking Giant Steps Away From EU

According to Germany’s Gabriel, “Turkey will never be EU member under Erdogan”

Berlin has been Intensifying Agitation against Turkey

Kurds Drive a Wedge between US and Turkey

US-Rebels Clash in Syria Becomes Attempt to 'Prevent Turkey from Entering Afrin'

Will Russia Move Its Capital to Siberia?

In the forty-fourth edition of the Russian Newspapers Monitor, Professor Filip Kovacevic discusses the articles from four Russian newspapers: Nezavisimaya Gazeta, Izvestia, Rossiyskaya Gazeta, and Sovietskaya Rossiya. He discusses how much the new U.S. sanctions will diminish the Russian gross domestic product and how Russia could repair the damage. Professor Kovacevic also talks about the sudden spread of the Coxsackievirus in Turkey and its repercussions for the thousands of Russian tourists. In addition, he discusses the proposals for the relocation of the Russian capital city to Siberia and the consequences of the failed putsch against the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev in August 1991, exactly 26 years ago.

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Show Notes

Nezavisimaya Gazeta – August 21, 2017

Izvestia – August 18, 2017

Rossiyskaya Gazeta – August 21, 2017

Sovietskaya Rossiya – August 19, 2017

Putin’s Delight: U.S.-EU Economic War Over Russia

In the fortieth edition of the Russian Newspapers Monitor, Professor Filip Kovacevic discusses the articles from four Russian newspapers: Rossiyskaya Gazeta, Izvestia, Nezavisimaya Gazeta, and Komsomolskaya Pravda. He discusses the unfolding of a serious economic conflict between the U.S. and the European Union over the relations with Russia, the geopolitical dynamic that may lead to the breakout of a civil war in Moldova, the way Russia plans to celebrate the Day of its National Navy, and the surprising affection of the young people in Russia for the Soviet Communist leader Josef Stalin.

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Show Notes

Rossiyskaya Gazeta – July 25, 2017

Izvestia – July 26, 2017

Nezavisimaya Gazeta – July 25, 2017

Komsomolskaya Pravda – July 21, 2017

As The Flood Waters Increase In Trump’s Swamp… Soros Eyes Asia Through ISIS

The hottest stories from Newsbud.com in this weekly round up, plus a sneak peak of whats to come.

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Show Notes

Weapons & Energy: Putin-Erdogan Alliance

Space War: Feeding the Military Industrial Complex

American Horror Story: The Shameful Truth About the Government’s Secret Experiments

India Blinks! Soros in Asia; and Pattycake with Miles Kwok

Newsbud Exclusive – After Nuland, “Nuland”: A. Wess Mitchell Nominated to Direct the U.S. European & Eurasian Affairs

Qatar – Russia’s Newest Ally in the Arab World?

In the thirty-sixth edition of the Russian Newspapers Monitor, Professor Filip Kovacevic discusses the articles from three Russian newspapers: Nezavisimaya Gazeta, Izvestia, and Kommersant. He discusses the Russian response to NATO military exercises near the Russian borders, the escalation of internal political tensions in Moldova, the reasons why Qatar might be the newest Russian ally in the Arab world, and how the Russian Parliament plans to deal with the alleged U.S./NATO interference in the Russian domestic politics.

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Show Notes

Nezavisimaya Gazeta – June 2, 2017

Nezavisimaya Gazeta – June 6, 2017

Izvestia – June 2, 2017

Kommersant – June 6, 2017

After Operations Gladio A & B Exposures, NATO Launches Operation Gladio C!

In this twenty-seventh edition of the Russian Newspapers Monitor, Professor Filip Kovacevic discusses the articles from four Russian newspapers: Rossiyskaya Gazeta, Nezavisimaya Gazeta, Izvestia, and Pravda. He discusses the U.S-NATO ad for the Russian language speakers to participate in NATO exercises in Germany, the U.S.-German public row over military spending increases, the potential motives for the terrorist attack in St. Petersburg, the Russia-Belarus special forces and intelligence coordination against NATO Gladio C covert operations, and the Russian Communist party critique of both the Western-funded Russian opposition AND the Russian government.

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Show Notes

Rossiyskaya Gazeta – March 31, 2017

Nezavisimaya Gazeta – April 3, 2017

Izvestia – April 4, 2017

Nezavisimaya Gazeta – April 5, 2017

Pravda – April 4, 2017

Newsbud Exclusive – CIA, the Golitsyn-Nosenko Affair & the Russian TV Series ‘Traitors’

Whether or not there was in fact any Russian “hacking” of the 2016 U.S. presidential election, it is not possible to deny the ineptness and incompetence of the CIA in dealing with this issue. The public statements of its leading figures as well as the declassified reports released to the public so far have only further discredited the CIA leadership in the eyes of objective observers and impartial intelligence specialists. Any student in the top 25 percent of my classes could have written a segment on the RT TV channel included in the recent report. And I am sure that he or she would have used more recent sources than the fall of 2012.[1]

It is mind-boggling to think that the U.S. taxpayers have been subsidizing this kind of shoddy work with tens of billions of dollars every year. How many hospitals and schools could have been built and how many people could have obtained decent health care and received university scholarships on this money! There is no doubt in my mind that all those responsible for this tragic waste of money and other resources must be fired and replaced by conscientious individuals whose expertise will rise above political opportunism.

This is not the first time that the CIA has proven to be woefully inadequate to protect the key national security interests of the U.S. In fact, it appears that its biggest and most damaging failure took place in the 1950s when the formidable Soviet intelligence agency, the KGB, penetrated it by recruiting an insider who was never discovered. It all went downhill from then on.

The Golitsyn-Nosenko Affair

The issue of an undiscovered KGB spy in the top echelons of the CIA represented the crux of the infamous Golitsyn-Nosenko affair which pitted different departments within the CIA against one another in the 1960s and severely impacted the work of the agency for years. On one side, there was the long-time CIA counter-intelligence chief James Jesus Angleton and the CIA Soviet section officers Tennent (Pete) Bagley and David Murphy. On the other, there was the CIA chief William Colby and the CIA officers Bruce Solie and John Hart.

The context as well as both the prologue and the epilogue to the affair are described in detail in Pete Bagley’s 2007 book Spy Wars.[2] It essentially came down to the question of which KGB defector was to be trusted: Anatoly Golitsyn or Yuri Nosenko.

Golitsyn was the first of the two to defect to the West, already in December 1961. His key message was that the KGB penetrated the leadership of all Western intelligence agencies. Not only the CIA, but also the MI-5 & 6 and the French DGSE. Though this claim may sound incredible, the subsequent escape to Russia of Kim Philby, who was one step removed from being the head of MI-6 and was the key liaison between the MI-6 and the CIA in the late 1940s, and the resignation of the MI-5 chief Roger Hollis in the mid-1960s demonstrated that Bagley and Angleton were far from being paranoid (as they were slandered by their opponents) in taking the side of Golitsyn.

However, that was not all Golitsyn claimed. He also insisted that all the defectors coming after him would be KGB plants sent to confuse and disorient the CIA and distract it from searching for a mole in its midst. This mole had been passing the KGB the valuable information with the potential to expose and damage most CIA operations in Europe and elsewhere, including the recruitment efforts within the Soviet Union.

The first KGB defector who came after Golitsyn was Nosenko. He first contacted the CIA in May 1962 in Geneva (where he was handled by Bagley), but decided to return to the Soviet Union. Then, in January 1964, Nosenko re-appeared in Geneva and turned himself over to the CIA.

The basic difference between Golitsyn’s and Nosenko’s claims was that while Golitsyn claimed that the Western intelligence agencies were penetrated, Nosenko claimed that they were not, that everything was fine, and that there was no reason to worry. That was precisely what Golitsyn claimed that any subsequent defector, a KGB plant, would do.

Golitsyn's claim was the reason why Angleton had Nosenko confined for years in a special CIA prison and subjected to constant interrogations. However, Nosenko never admitted that he was a KGB plant, though his stories, according to Bagley, were absurdly inconsistent and incoherent. In Bagley’s opinion, Nosenko might have been a perfect Manchurian candidate. Peter Deriabin, another KGB officer who defected in the 1950s, concurred with Bagley’s judgment and his statement is included in Bagley’s book as an appendix.

Yet, with the new CIA leadership taking charge, Nosenko was rehabilitated, received a CIA pension, and began working as a CIA consultant. In 2008, a month before he died at age 81, he was presented with a letter of then-CIA director Michael Hayden which praised his service for the U.S. and implied that he was a bona fide defector.[3] On the other hand, Bagley, greatly disappointed, left the CIA in 1973, and Angleton was discredited (in another scandal) and forced to resign in 1975.

Bagley died in 2014 at age 88 soon after publishing a book entitled Spymaster based on the recollections of Sergey Kondrashev, a former high-level KGB official, who was familiar with the massive KGB Cold War deception operations against the West.[4] The Russian intelligence refused to allow Kondrashev to publish the book, but since he died in 2007, Bagley published it in the U.S. with the permission of Kondrashev’s family. Obviously, there are things in the book that today’s Russian intelligence apparatus would rather keep from becoming public knowledge. As with every intelligence agency in the world, this is always the issue of sources and methods.

And so, the mystery of what the KGB was really up to with Golitsyn and Nosenko continues to this day. However, in my opinion, the recently aired Russian TV series ‘Traitors’ adds a new and important twist to the story. In a round-about, indirect way, which is how all intelligence public statements and declassified products must be interpreted, it gives enough hints to make me conclude that Bagley and Angleton may have been right after all.

The Russian TV Series ‘Traitors’

The Russian TV station Zvezda [meaning the star], owned by the Russian military, produced this documentary TV series for three seasons starting in 2014.[5] It aired 24 episodes in total, eight in each season. They can all be found and viewed on Youtube.[6] The episodes covered 24 individuals declared traitors by the leadership of the Soviet Union, from the 1920s to the 1980s. There was even one American, Elizabeth Bentley, known as the “queen of Red espionage,” who, in the late 1940s, revealed to the FBI the network of the Soviet spies she organized on the territory of the U.S.[7] She was the only woman included.

The entire series was hosted by the ex-KGB officer Andrey Lugovoy who is sought by the British government to stand trial for the fatal polonium poisoning of the Russian intelligence defector Alexander Litvinenko in London. At this time, Lugovoy is a member of the Russian Duma [the lower house of the Parliament] representing the pro-government Liberal-Democratic Party (LDPR) led by the virulent Russian nationalist Vladimir Zhirinovsky. Quite recently, on January 9, 2017, Lugovoy was added to the list of the Russian citizens under U.S. sanctions.[8]

The Russian audiences appear to enjoy having former spies host documentary programs on TV. Anna Chapman, who was arrested for spying by the FBI in 2010 and, together with nine other so-called Illegals, exchanged for four U.S. spies imprisoned in Russia, also had her own show on REN TV. The title of her show was “The Secrets of the World. The Riddles of the Cosmos.”[9]

The 24 “traitors” covered by the TV Zvezda series included Anatoly Golitsyn and Yuri Nosenko. The episodes about them were aired in the second season of the series. I watched both episodes closely in order to test the following hypothesis: if Golitsyn was a genuine defector and Nosenko was a plant, then the presentation and treatment of Golitsyn will be more negative and harsher than the treatment of Nosenko. In fact, as I will explain in detail below, this is precisely what I found.

The episode on Golitsyn was aired first.[10] From the very beginning, the episode sought to present Golitsyn as somebody not to be trusted. It reported, for instance, that he was not liked by his co-workers and that his nickname was “the hunchback.” The KGB veterans interviewed in the episode also expressed distinctly negative opinions about him. The retired KGB general Alexander Duhanin, for instance, claimed that Golitsyn did not have access to any significant information, but claimed to know a lot in order to get more money and privileges from the Western intelligence services. He emphasized the alleged Golitsyn’s love of luxury and the heightened sense of self-importance. The episode even went so far as to say that Golitsyn was diagnosed as a paranoid personality with pathological symptoms by the chief CIA psychologist, John Gittinger. This, by the way, is directly contradicted by Bagley who, in his book, claimed that it was Nosenko who was diagnosed by Gittinger, and not Golitsyn.[11]

In fact, Bagley in particular singled out Oleg Nechiporenko, former KGB officer now turned historian of the Russian intelligence, as somebody who was especially eager to extol Nosenko’s genuineness as a defector and demean Golitsyn.[12] Bagley suspected that this was a part of the enduring KGB/SVR plan to hide the Cold War penetration of the CIA. Nechiporenko’s appearance in the episode confirmed Bagley’s claims made years earlier. His statements did indeed represent the character assassination of both Golitsyn and Angleton.

Even Edward Jay Epstein, a well-known U.S. journalist and intelligence community researcher, who was a friend of Bagley and wrote a preface to Bagley’s last book, did not seem convincing in his defense of Golitsyn. This, I suspect, was the result of selective presentation of his statements by the episode’s producers.

In the end, the viewer is left with the impression that Golitsyn was an extremely successful but psychologically unstable con artist who fooled the Western intelligence community in order to get rich and did not provide them with any secret intelligence worth the money he received. However, the episode admitted that Golitsyn was nevertheless sentenced to death in absentia by the KGB and that his only daughter Katya died suddenly, supposedly of drug overdose, in Rome in the 1970s. Golitsyn himself passed away recently, but neither the time of his death nor the place of burial are known, which is another difference between him and Nosenko.

Although the episode on Nosenko had pretty much the same cast of interviewees, their reactions to Nosenko were very different from their reactions to Golitsyn. Their attitude toward Nosenko was much more upbeat: Nosenko was not “the hunchback,” but the son of Stalin’s favorite government minister. Such a positive attitude was particularly surprising, considering that they also claimed that Nosenko caused grave damage to the KGB foreign operations and that the damage was more extensive in scope than that caused by Golitsyn.

Nechiporenko, for instance, claimed that approximately 300 to 400 Soviet intelligence agents were recalled to Moscow due to being exposed by Nosenko’s revelations, the claim which was already debunked by Bagley's book.[13] He also stated that Angleton convinced Bagley that Nosenko was a KGB plant, whereas Bagley in detail described how he came to this conclusion on his own, after months and months of interrogating Nosenko. How could Nechiporenko know better than Bagley what the latter himself went through?

Moreover, Nechiporenko directly stated that Nosenko could not have been a double agent, whereas the general Duhanin ridiculed and caricatured the CIA interrogation process. They seemed to be defending Nosenko, which was paradoxical if he had caused as much damage to the KGB as they claimed he had. It was as if it was more significant to them that Nosenko was victimized by the CIA than that he gave away very important Soviet secrets. Should they not be content that the person who betrayed them had to suffer the consequences of his misdeed, even if by their opponents’ hand? There is only one condition under which they should not: if Nosenko worked for them.

In fact, this is precisely the conclusion that one comes away with, if one compares Bagley’s account of the Golitsyn-Nosenko affair and the account presented by Lugavoy and TV Zvezda. By embracing Nosenko with open arms (he even lectured at Langley) and smearing Bagley and Angleton, the CIA chose to trust the wrong guy and therefore utterly failed in counterintelligence work. It is likely that many of its problems today stem from the repetition of this same basic pattern. It would not be inconceivable that even right now there is a Russian mole in its midst whom it cannot ferret out because it has consistently refused to learn the lessons of the past.

# # # #

Dr. Filip Kovacevic, Newsbud Analyst & commentator, is a geopolitical author, university professor and the chairman of the Movement for Neutrality of Montenegro. He received his BA and PhD in political science in the US and was a visiting professor at St. Petersburg State University in Russia for two years. He is the author of seven books, dozens of academic articles & conference presentations and hundreds of newspaper columns and media commentaries. He has been invited to lecture throughout the EU, Balkans, ex-USSR and the US. He currently resides in San Francisco. He can be contacted at fk1917@yahoo.com

NOTES

[1] http://stmedia.startribune.com/documents/1russia010717.pdf

[2] Tennent H. Bagley. Spy Wars: Moles, Mysteries, and Deadly Games. New Haven, NJ: Yale, 2007.

[3] http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/28/us/28nosenko.html

[4] Tennent H. Bagley. Spymaster: Startling Cold War Revelations of a Soviet KGB Chief. New York: Skyhorse Publishing, 2013.

[5] http://tvzvezda.ru/schedule/filmsonline/content/201409301945-kbdj.htm/

[6]

[7] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q29cD5C5gWc

[8] https://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/sanctions/OFAC-Enforcement/Pages/20170109.aspx

[9] https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_r67RjmWlFz2OBjFTBKx4ywJDXE67GCF

[10] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6BS85sdBps&list=PLcRxMIXa98X-fY9Nvo1N3SOMP7ajzxWPa&index=7

[11] Bagley, Spy Wars, p. 190.

[12] Bagley, Spy Wars, pp. 211-212.

[13] Bagley, Spy Wars, p. 209-212.

Turkey Chooses Russia over NATO in Syria

In this fifteenth edition of the Russian Newspapers Monitor, Professor Filip Kovacevic discusses the articles from four Russian newspapers: RBK, Kommersant, Izvestia, and Komsomolskaya Pravda. He discusses the record gas exports to Europe by the Russian gas giant Gazprom, the Russia-Turkey-Iran relations on the eve of the Syrian conflict resolution negotiations in Astana, the interview of the top Russian diplomat at the UN, Vitaly Churkin, and the Russian reaction to the president-elect Donald Trump’s first press conference. Professor Kovacevic also provides a proof that the CIA, the FBI, and the NSA are reading the Russian tabloid press.

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Show Notes

RBC - Jan 10, 2017

Kommersant - Jan 11, 2017

Izvestia Moscow Edition - Jan 10, 2017

Izvestia – Jan 12, 2017

Komsomolskaya Pravda - Jan 11, 2017