Narco News: FBI Director Candidate Comey Complicit in “Dark Chapter” in US History

Former Deputy Attorney General Played Leading Role in Cover-Up of US Government Informant’s Participation in Mass Murder in Mexico

By Bill Conroy

President Barack Obama is expected to nominate former George W. Bush-era Deputy Attorney General James Comey as the next director of the FBI, according to multiple media outlets that have published fawning reports about Comey’s supposed independence and upstanding moral character.

Comey, according to those reports, is deemed the ideal pick because he is a Republican who also is admired by Democrats for his principled stand against the Bush Administration’s warrantless surveillance program — a still highly-classified program Comey ultimately acquiesced to after some unspecified technical changes were adopted by the Bush administration.

But is Comey, who now serves on the board of the giant British Lender HSBC, really the guy in the white hat the commercial media – always enamored of power and not so much principle – paints him to be? [Read more...]

Drug-War Homicides Spiking Under Mexican President Peña Nieto

Mexico-based Private Security Firm’s Intelligence Shows Big Jump in Murders, Political Assassinations Since December 2012

By Bill Conroy

The administration of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has made it a priority to divert the media’s focus from the drug war and toward his economic efforts to bring the Latin American nation in closer alignment with the international corporate agenda of assuring a cheap supply labor and nearly risk-free return on investment. So he is much more eager to talk about the benefits of a gradual privatization of PEMEX, Mexico’s state-owned energy company, than he is to discuss the realities of the ongoing, bloody drug war that was ramped up by his predecessor in Los Pinos, former Mexican President Felipe Calderón.

Toward that end, Peña Nieto has put a halt to the parade of TV-camera narco-villain perp walks popularized by Calderón and promised to address the street-level violence of the drug war as opposed to employing the military in large numbers to hunt down criminal-organization leaders. Given Peña Nieto’s radical policy departure from the Calderon administration’s all-out war on the “cartels,” and his imperative of putting corporate trade and commerce at the tip of his policy sword, it is crucial that Peña Nieto demonstrate early success in reducing the visible violence of the drug war — which produced some 120,000 homicides in Mexico over the course of the six years Calderón held office…

Read the rest of this story by Bill Conroy here at Narco News: Click Here

NarcoNews Investigative Story- US Prosecutors Turned a Blind Eye to Drone Code Piracy

The Free Pass for “Too-Big-to-Fail” Netezza vs. The Prosecution of Swartz

By Bill Conroy of NarcoNews

Aaron Swartz, a 26-year-old Internet activist and the co-developer of popular web tools like RSS feeds and Reddit, ended his life earlier this year at the end of a long battle with federal prosecutors in Boston — who had accused him of engaging in digital piracy.

Under the umbrella of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, the prosecutors in Swartz’ case, led by US Attorney Carmen Ortiz, piled multiple criminal counts on him that collectively could have locked him up for a quarter century. His alleged transgression: Stashing a laptop computer in a closet of a building on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus (where Swartz was a research fellow) and using it to download several million academic articles — many the product of taxpayer funding — from the archives of a nonprofit online library called JSTOR.

Nobody was harmed in Swartz’ alleged crime, and JSTOR itself argued against pressing charges, but federal prosecutors pressed forward zealously, seemingly looking to make Swartz a stepping stone for their careers. However, US Attorney Ortiz, and her team of legal hounds, sparked international outrage for their actions when the target of their prosecutorial persecution, by then a cult hero in the tech world, on Jan. 11 committed suicide by hanging himself in his New York apartment. [Read more...]

NarcoNews: US Training of Mexican Troops Has Escalated in Step with Mexico’s Murder Rate

Boots-On-The-Ground Instruction Carried Out by US Military in Mexico City, Campeche and Chiapas — Home of the Zapatistas

By Bill Conroy

US training of Mexican military forces spiked in fiscal years 2010 and 2011, coinciding with a sharp rise in drug-war homicides in Mexico, an analysis of records made public under the Foreign Assistance Act show.

The training in those two years, funded by the US Department of Defense, and to a lesser extent by the US Department of State, covered a wide range of military skill sets and involved hundreds of training programs offered in the US to Mexican forces as well as dozens (at least 60) provided inside Mexico. [Read more...]

Big Media Discovers US Special Ops are Targeting Mexican Crime Organizations

Unlike Wine, Old News Doesn’t Improve With Age

By Bill Conroy

Earlier this week, the Washington Post and a series of other mainstream media outlets breathlessly reported that the Pentagon has set up a US-based special operations center that is focused on helping the Mexican government track down “cartels.”

The real nut-graph of the Post story, however, is buried at the end of the article:

US officials stress that sharing this expertise does not mean U.S. special operations teams will be conducting raids against targets in Mexico, nor will they be entering the country with their own weapons. Mexico forbids U.S. military or law enforcement officers from carrying guns inside their borders, with few exceptions, though American commandos have conducted training missions in the past, two current and one former U.S. military official said. [Read more...]

Fast & Furious Blurs the Line Between Cops and Crooks

ATF Supervisor’s Questionable Gun Purchases Appear to Be Business As Usual

By Bill Conroy

fafTwo guns of interest were found in late November of last year near the scene of a gun battle in the Mexican state of Sinaloa. The battle, waged between the Mexican military and alleged drug traffickers, left five people dead, including a Mexican solider and a beauty queen named Maria Susana Flores Gamez.

One of those guns can be traced back to a Phoenix gun store that sold multiple weapons to local, state and federal law enforcers who allegedly provided inaccurate information on firearms-transaction reports filed as part of those purchases, Narco News has learned. The ultimate fate of those guns is not known but the potential fallout for multiple law enforcers in the Phoenix area could be serious, possibly even criminal, should the matter be investigated thoroughly — though it is that potential alone that may assure no law enforcer or prosecutor is going to take on the task. [Read more...]

Banks Are “Where the Money Is” in the Drug War

“Big Lenders Face Few Hard Consequences for Violating Anti-Money Laundering Laws”

By Bill Conroy

banks1Citigroup, JP Morgan Chase & Co., Wachovia (acquired by Wells Fargo in 2009), HSBC Holdings, ING Bank, Standard Chartered, American Express Bank International, and not a few others, have a common bond beyond ranking among the largest banks in the world.

All have been accused within the past five years (and several this year) of failing to comply with US anti-money laundering laws — thereby enabling, collectively, hundreds of billions of dollars worth of suspicious transactions to move through the banking system absent adequate monitoring or oversight.

Yet not one these banks, nor any of their top executives, has been hit with criminal sanctions. [Read more...]

Murder of Miami’s ‘Cocaine Queen’ Offers Teaching Moment

The Truth of the Drug War Won’t Be Found in Hollywood or the Mainstream Media — Which Both Work From the Same Tired Script

By Bill Conroy

cocainequeenGriselda Blanco, 69, was cut down in front of a butcher shop in Medellin, Colombia, in early September by a middle-aged man who was delivered to the murder scene on the back of a motorcycle — and who calmly, methodically, jumped off the back of that bike, held a gun to Blanco’s head, and pumped two bullets into her brain.

Blanco, well prior to her death, had been pumped up as a rock star of the drug war by the US mainstream media and various Hollywood-inspired films, such as the Cocaine Cowboys documentary. In fact, at the time of her death, several feature films about her life as a big-time cocaine dealer and killer in Miami in the 1970s and early 1980s were reportedly in the works — including one in which movie star Jennifer Lopez is seeking to play the leading role as the “Narco Queen” in hopes of winning an Oscar, according to Fox News Latino. [Read more...]

Texas Case Raises Troubling Questions About ATF Gunwalking

Rio Grande Valley Businessman Was The Target of Multiple Arms-Trafficking Investigations Yet He Continued To Acquire Guns Through Straw Buyers

By Bill Conroy @ the Narcosphere

ATF1A series of criminal investigations initiated some four years ago by ATF agents, all focused on a weapons-trafficking ring in South Texas, appear to shred the long-running talking point that the Obama Administration alone is responsible for unleashing an irresponsible operation that allowed thousands of illegally purchased guns to be trafficked into Mexico via a tactic known as “gunwalking.”

That Obama Administration operation, dubbed Fast and Furious, was launched in the fall of 2009 and terminated in early 2011 in the wake of a Republican-led Congressional probe into the program. [Read more...]

Media Cover Up: U.S. Government Invokes National Security to Conceal Deal Cut with Mexican Drug Cartel

Mainstream Media Assists Government in Cloaking Evidence of an Ugly Duplicity in the So-Called Drug War


nieblaOn Saturday, October 1, 2011, investigative journalist Bill Conroy of the Narcosphere reported scandalous and highly troubling new developments in the criminal case against accused Mexican narco-trafficker Jesus Vicente Zambada Niebla. The breaking story unravels the U.S. government’s ugly national-security interests in the drug war by exposing a quid pro quo deal between the US government and the most powerful international narco-trafficking organization on the planet- the Sinaloa “Cartel,” and the US government’s recent attempt to cover this up by filing a motion in the case seeking to invoke the Classified Information Procedures Act (CIPA), a measure designed to assure national security information does not become public during court proceedings.

Zambada Niebla, son of one of the leaders of the Sinaloa “Cartel,” arguably the most powerful international narco-trafficking organization on the planet, argues in his criminal case, now pending in federal court in Chicago, that he and the leadership of Mexico’s Sinaloa drug-trafficking organization, were, in effect, working for the U.S. government for years by providing US agents with intelligence about rival drug organizations.

In exchange for that cooperation, Zambada Niebla contends, the US government granted the leadership of the Sinaloa “Cartel” immunity from prosecution for their criminal activities — including the narco-trafficking charges he now faces in Chicago.

The government, in court pleadings filed last month, denies that claim but at the same time has filed a motion in the case seeking to invoke the Classified Information Procedures Act (CIPA), a measure designed to assure national security information does not become public during court proceedings.

CIPACIPA, enacted 30 years ago, is designed to keep a lid on public disclosure in criminal cases of classified materials, such as details associated with clandestine FBI or CIA operations. In this case, however, the invocation appears to be for the purpose of covering up a scandalous and shady quid pro quo deal between the US government and a drug cartel. Not only that, the Niebla case also threatens to further expose another US government scandal:

It is important to note again that most of the weapons allowed to cross from the US unimpeded into Mexico by ATF’s Fast and Furious were going to the Sinaloa "Cartel," according to a report issued in July by Issa and Grassley.

So, given Zambada Niebla's claim ithat “some of the [Fast and Furious] weapons were deliberately allowed by the FBI and other government representatives to end up in the hands of the Sinaloa "Cartel,” it seems his attorneys may want to pose some serious questions to witnesses suspected of having knowledge of that alleged act, including DEA’s Roberts, as well as the special agent in charge of the FBI’s New Mexico operations, Carol K.O. Lee and the U.S. Attorney for New Mexico, Kenneth J. Gonzales.

Such a prospect can’t be very uplifting for the prosecution in Zambada Niebla’s case and might explain, in part, why there is an effort afoot by the US law-enforcement and intelligence officials to cloak the revelations, the evidence, that might surface in the case under the seal of national security.

Prosecutors on Monday, Oct. 3, filed a motion in federal court in Chicago rebutting the accused Mexican narco-trafficker’s argument that he has been denied access to critical evidence in preparing his defense:

In their pleadings, prosecutors again affirm the government’s position that there was no immunity deal offered to the accused narco-trafficker or to the leadership of the Sinaloa drug-trafficking organization. The pleadings filed by the prosecution do not address directly why the government is seeking to invoke national-security procedures for Zambada Niebla’s case

Monday’s filing by prosecutors confirms that Zambada Niebla’s case does raise national security issues that require, according to those prosecutors, that special procedures be established by the court — under a 30-year-old law known as the Classified Information Procedures Act — to assure that classified materials do not become public during the court proceedings.

There seems to be another equally troubling and scandalous angle to this story: the US media’s synchronized and orchestrated black out of this massive scandal, most likely at the behest of the US government: [Read more...]